HMTV Exclusive Interview with Mr Vijay Kumar, Advisor to Govt of AP

Transcript (in English) of the interview with Mr Vijay Kumar garu, Advisor to Government of AP, telecasted on HMTV Agri in the programme – Nela Thalli Karyakramam (Complete video in Telugu is available at the end of this transcript.:

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

Although Green Revolution (haritha viplavam in Telugu) might have satiated hunger of Indians in the past, it has however leading towards farmer suicides today. Farmers used chemicals and fertilizers in huge quantities that resulted in increased investments and increased borrowings, eventually leading to suicides.

To find a solution to this problem, Government of Andhra Pradesh is laying out a new path. In the current scenario, Government believes that Natural Farming is the only solution. To this effect, Government is also conducting a 9-day training programme through Subhash Palekar in Guntur starting from 31st December.

To discuss the objectives and Government’s plan of action, we have with us Mr Vijay Kumar, Advisor to Government of AP, Agriculture Department.

Greetings Sir. Can you share with us the Government’s plan of action in agriculture and how it wants to take it forward?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

The main objective of Government of AP is to ensure farmer’s welfare.

As farmers deal with increased investments and increased risks, agriculture is no longer appearing as profitable opportunity. Through Natural Farming, the Government has set an objective to completely reduce farmer’s investments and risks, increase yields and transfer the farmer as one who produces quality food. All of this is for welfare of the farmer.

On the other side, another objective of Government is to make sure consumers eat poison-free food, and eat food that has more nutrient value.

This way, Government is protecting the interest of both groups – farmers and consumers.

Beyond addressing the needs of these two groups, the third important objective of Government is to protect Mother Earth. Increasing soil fertility, increasing the water-holding capacity, and increasing biodiversity in nature are the great benefits of Natural Farming.

In summary, Government is working on three aspects – farmer’s welfare, consumers welfare and to develop Mother Earth that is supporting both farmers and consumers.

Further, we are not only thinking about the existing farmers but also the next generation farmers. What happens to agriculture 50 years from now, 100 years from now? In order to develop agriculture in coming years, Government of AP believes that Natural Farming is the best way forward.

Recognising the importance of all of this, Department of Agriculture has been implementing the programme on Natural Farming since 2.5 years.

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

Can you tell us the main objective of the (Training) programme to be started on 31st (December) and share with us the schedule?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

In last 2.5 years, when Natural Farming was taken-up as a policy by Government of AP, Shri Subash Palekar garu, has arranged two large training programmes. One was in January 2016 in Kakinada. We were fortunate that while delivering the training programme in Kakinada, he Padmashree Award was conferred on him. The second training was in September 2016 in Tirupati. Now, the (third) one we are conducting has unique features. Firstly, 8000 farmers are attending this training programme. This is going to be on a large scale. Farmers from each mandal of Andhra Pradesh have registered for this training programme. Ever since the training programme was conducted in last 2 years, Natural Farming is currently being practiced in 331 mandals i.e half of the mandals in Andhra Pradesh. In next one year, the Natural Farming will be practiced in atleast one panchayat in each of the remaining mandals. The farmers from these Panchayats are attending this year’s training programme. Among 8000 farmers attending the training program, about 5000 are farmers from about 1000 villages in the 331 mandals (where Natural Farming is being practiced). These farmers are the trainers. We call them Community Resource Persons or CRPs. Each of them has a responsibility to motivate at least 100 farmers to practice Natural Farming. If we are bringing 5000 farmers to this training programme, it means that through them we want to reach out to 500,000 farmers and motivate them to adopt Natural Farming.  

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

As you said Government has been implementing the plan for last 2.5 years. If you look back, what is the progress that you have made? What changes have you observed? It may not be in terms of numbers but what changes have you seen in the farmers adoption practices?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

I have visited several villages. I would have visited at least 100 villages in all the district. There is a big change in the lives of the farmers who have adopted Natural Farming. I could see the happiness in them.

The other day, I went to Vijayanagaram District. The Sarpanch in a village proudly said that it is because of natural farming that I bought a car today. Generally if we go to a village we get to hear the woes of the farmers. But here they are very happy.

In Cuddapah district, a farmer who cultivates betel leaves told me that he was able to save 12 lakhs in a year because of Natural Farming.

Landless, marginal tenant farmers are saying that they are producing good quality food that they themselves are consuming. They are saying it profitable for them.

In one village, a farmer was telling me that he is able to find birds flying freely only on his farm and not anywhere else.

Yet another farmer practicing natural farming in Anantapur District narrated to me that there were earthworms that he found in his farm and his neighbouring farmers use them for fishing.

So on one side, farmers are happy, have reduced their expenses and increased yields. On the other side, I started to believe more when I found that farms practicing Natural Farming were drought-resilient than those that were not practicing natural farming. A neighbouring farmer within the same village, with same seeds and same type of soil suffered more losses due to drought than the farmer who was practicing natural farming under similar circumstances.

So, the learning here is that when we develop the quality of soil, farmers get to benefit the most.

Earlier there used to be a doubt for the farmers – they thought that yields will come down because of natural farming. Many thought so. But Palekar ji said very clear that if all principles of Natural Farming are practiced, yields will not come down. When we did Crop Cutting Experiments, there was an increase of 10% yield in grains. It did not decrease.  

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

Even though there are several success case studies, even though Palekar ji has trained several farmers, even though those farmers are motivating other farmers, yet the total number of farmers adopting Natural Farming is not upto the expectations in both Telugu states – Telangana and Andhra Pradesh. Are there any weaknesses or drawbacks in Natural Farming?  Or, Are farmers not interested to adopt Natural Farming? Or, are there any doubts in the farmers minds? How should we see this?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

This is a very good question. Not only our two states, Palekar ji is training in many other states, and the conversion rate is low.  However, in our state of Andhra Pradesh, we have given it a different approach. One thing we noted is that there are great values embedded in the principles of Natural Farming. By bringing back life in the land, there are so many benefits. We cannot survive long if the land is dead. The principles taught by Palekar ji are very good. No doubt about them. But what you have said is also correct – why are such good principled practice not able to convert farmers? That is the reason why we have taken a different approach.

Our goal is to convert all farmers in 2000 villages. Converting 5 lakh farmers and 5 lakh hectares of land into natural farming is Government of AP’s objective. We are not bringing farmers to the training program in any which way. Our approach is very systematic. Even in Kakinada training, we brought about 5 farmers from each of 700 villages. We appointed Community Resource Persons in every village to train the farmers. Nearly 1000 CRPs have been deployed. These CRPs have been practicing Natural Farming on their own lands or leased lands. After seeing the benefits themselves, they have come forward to help other farmers. So our training went to these farmer trainers (CRPs) and to farmers who have shown interest in the natural farming. These CRPs go to each farmer household to motivate them to adopt natural farming. The CRPs stay in the villages itself to clarify any doubts that farmers may get while practicing natural farming. Unlike other states, AP is following a different policy and different approach. If we enter a village, our goal is to make sure all farmers in that village are converted to natural farming. From among the farmers who are converted, few best farmers are selected and sent to neighbouring villages to convert other farmers.

We have decided that we will focus our work in 2000 villages in the first phase for next five years. So far, the work has begun in 972 villages. In the next year, we will add another 600-700 villages. Now, about 5000 farmers from 972 villages who are already practicing natural farming will come for the Palekar training. They will be given responsibility to convert 100 farmers. In addition to this, Government’s goal is to make this work in at least one Gram Panchayat in every mandal.   

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

Unless chemicals are kept aside, farmers will not have sustainable livelihoods. Chemicals have been destroying the nature. Even in the interest of consumers chemicals should be kept aside. This seems to be the generic theme that you have adopted. However, what is Government’s message to those farmers who are not practicing Natural Farming? Is the Government (through Agriculture Department) suggesting those farmers to use chemicals or not to use chemicals? Let us say, hypothetically, that if an Agriculture Officer in a particular area is supposed to recommend a solution to a farmer concerning problem in the crop, will that officer suggest the farmer to use chemicals?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

This is a very good question. We cannot change all people at once. Department of Agriculture, not only in Andhra Pradesh but also in most states, is implementing IPM. IPM is called Integrated Pest Management. No one advocates farmers to use chemicals in any which manner. So, aspects such as preventive practices, manual trapping, and such other non-chemical involved practices are very much included within the principles of Department of Agriculture. If they don’t work, then they are advising the farmers to use chemicals. However, in the clusters where Natural Farming is being implemented, the entire department including staff and Officers  are advocating only Natural Farming practices. Our Agriculture Staff and Officers have been trained in Kakinada and Tirupati trainings on Natural Farming. Mandal-level Officers, Assistant Director of Agriculture, FTCs (Farmer Training Centers), etc. However not all farmers change their all of their practices at once. We are convincing those farmers by giving them options and showcasing some examples. Last year, because of Brown Planthoppers (BPH) attack, there was lot of damage. In Orissa, they declared it as a Natural Calamity – and even farmers were asked to burn their farms. But, our ZBNF farmers and ZBNF CRPs gave thutikada kashayam (a naturally-made decoction)  to all farmers and recommended them to use it to control BPH. In Vijayanagaram district, farmers from not only in the villages that we are working but also from the neighbouring ones started using it with good results.

So essentially we believe that this will work out in phases. As you said, Agriculture Department is suggesting farmers to use chemicals in some locations and at the same time suggesting not to use them in other locations. We have to live with that fact for some time. However, within the defined clusters that we are working, Agriculture Department has trained all. In fact, the department is taking it forward there.

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

When you approach a farmer you are saying that you are advocating Natural Farming and telling them that this practice is profitable to them. You are even taking this forward through the Department of Agriculture. While implementing this approach, is there any research that is being carried out in the entire system? I mean, in the coming days Department is planning to advocate natural farming and completely leave out chemical farming – so are there any big studies or experiments that you are planning to conduct in this regard?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

This is a good question because it is very essential to understand the science behind this model. If the future generation has to fetch benefits from this, then there is a need to establish the scientific principles. United Nations Organization have released a report in 2010 where they have analyzed that by 2050 World Population is expected to reach 970 Crores (9.7 Billion). Currently we are at 750 Crores (7.5 Billion). Similarly, agricultural land will reduce by one-third. And then, there is Global Warming. Due to Climate Change, risks are expected to increase in agriculture. Considering these, there were studies conducted to answer what is the best way to attain food security in the world. The recommendation from those studies is agro-ecology. So UN declared in 2010 itself that we can ensure food security only through Natural Farming. All countries were recommended to practice agro-ecology based agriculture. So it is being practiced in various countries in different formats.

So will this practice support agriculture in future? It may be ok now, but what if it gets into problem in future? So we need to know if it is good for both present and future generations. Also, will the natural farming help farmers cope with the various changes in nature such as global warming or climate change. Will there be reduction in Greenhouse gas emissions due to practicing Natural Farming? To study on such aspects, United Nations Environment Programme has come forward to partner with Government of Andhra Pradesh.

In addition to this, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is coming forward to partner with Government of Andhra Pradesh to establish the science behind Natural Farming. Internationally recognized scientific organizations will help them in this aspect and see if AP model can be scaled out across India and to entire world. This is how Government of AP is bringing best scientific institutions into picture.

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

Are there any studies that being conducted by our local research laboratories?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

Our State Government has given mandate to local research institutions to study this aspect.  For example local institutions were asked to study Green Revolution Vs Natural Farming. Ministry of Agriculture has given mandate to Central Research Institute for Dryland Agriculture (CRIDA) under Indian Council of Agriculture Research (ICAR) to study Natural Farming as a drought-proof recommended solution. Through Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana (RKVY scheme), ANGRAU (Acharya NG Ranga Agricultural University) was asked to study Zero Budget Natural Farming vs Green Revolution. So over a period of time, I think we should be getting results.

To a great extent we will be reducing Greenhouse Gases as we will not be using urea or chemicals. So scientifically we need to establish and give to the society a strong agriculture practice that will sustain over 100 years or 200 years or more.

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

We are trying to find solutions to the problems that were brought in by the Green Revolution. On one side you are saying Natural Farming is the solution. However, on the other side there is something called Organic Farming. Palekar ji says that Organic Farming is not suitable to our practices and not suitable in India. What do you suggest to farmers in this regard?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

As I have told you just now, we will adopt only Natural Farming practices in the villages that we are working. This means agriculture should be practiced in harmony with nature. As opposed to this, chemical farming or organic farming is not sustainable. We are very clear on this. In the villages that we have adopted, we are going forward with Natural Farming.

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

If you analyse by district or by crop, can you say which districts or which crops are in the forefront of Natural Farming in our state of Andhra Pradesh?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

This is going to be interesting because there is a competition between districts. Districts which have taken lot of interest in Natural Farming are North coastal districts followed by Rayalaseema districts. It is a well-known fact that fertilizer consumption and pesticide consumption is usually high in Delta regions. But very surprisingly, West Godavari District (part of Delta districts) a place where Green Revolution was first started, is doing the best (in terms of Natural Farming).

     

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

Okay. So the farmers in this district (West Godavari) are showing more interest in Natural Farming?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

Yeah, that’s how it appears so. They were so used to chemical fertilizers. Then take the example of Guntur. Even they were using pesticides and fertilizers in large quantities. Now if we talk about Krishna district – all farmers in about 4 villages are practicing natural farming. The credit goes to farmers. All districts have started thinking about this. Initially I thought some districts that may not have more fertilizer consumption may do well in Natural. That was my mindset earlier. But in reality, districts with more fertilizer usages in the past have shown remarkable interest in Natural Farming. This is a very good impact. Farmers have starting thinking on their own. Another important result we found is from tribal areas. There we have found that farmers cultivating Ragi and Guli Ragi through Zero Budget Natural Farming had yields of 10 quintals per acre compared to 4 quintals per acre through their earlier farming methods. This means the yield was 2.5 times more.

Similarly, a sugarcane farmer in Vijayanagaram who cultivated using spacing of 8×2 as recommended by Subash Palekar ji, yielded 53 tonnes per acre. This was found in Department’s Crop Cutting Experiments. The district average is between 25-28 kgs. So the yield was doubled. Such farmers are there in the districts. None of them think that they lost anything because of Natural Farming. They are thinking that results will be better if they improve these practices in this direction.

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

We are exporting chillies, mangoes, and some vegetables like tomatoes. Are you telling the farmers that they too can expect higher income if they cultivate using Natural Farming? Are you telling them that this kind of market demand exists globally?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

Firstly, what we are telling farmers is that they should produce for their self-consumption because the food we grow is healthy for you. Give the produce to others in your own village. Then, you think about marketing to those outside the village. And then we should think from consumers side also. Since shortages are not permanent, premiums may not last long. Farmers should not hope that there will be abnormal profits. We tell farmers that their investments should decrease, the yield should increase, quality of the produce should increase and more importantly protect their land so that they handover a sustainable land to their future generations. If one takes good care of their land, the land will take good care of them. This is how we are motivating farmers. Having said that, if there is a demand for exports, we will definitely support the farmers.   

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

Subhash Palekar ji says that there is no need of conducting soil tests. But you are conducting soil tests. Can you please give us a clarity on this?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

As per the policy of Government of India or as per the ICAR recommendation, we follow a particular system. In India, there is lot of reduction in the proportion of soil carbon when you compare with the situation that was prevailing some 50-60 years ago. Our soils are in a bad shape. This is obvious even if we do not conduct any tests. There are two things here: one is Palekar ji’s statement that if we regenerate any land, the nutrient values increase – I fully believe in this. He is very much correct. He says that land already has all nutrient values, however they are in a locked form. By increasing the microbial population, we are ensuring plants get nutrients. So soil quality will improve. This is as per Palekarji. Secondly, Government of India gave a directive to do soil testing. This may look contradictory for some time.  But if we establish that Natural Farming is superior, automatically that position of Government will change.

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

Subhash Palekar ji says that whoever does Natural Farming must have a Desi Cow. Are our farmers owning Desi Cow? Do we have any number of Desi cows that our farmers are owning?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

Palekar ji says that one desi cow is sufficient to cultivate 30 acres of land. So not all are required to take desi cows. If a village has 1000 acres of cultivable land, then they need about 40-50 desi cows. We have observed that farmers in every village are bringing desi cows. Through our programme we are supporting the cost of constructing cattle shed lining in order to collect urine. In some villages, particularly in thandas (tribal villages) we found that there are few farmers having 100-200 cows. There are many cows in tribal areas. So there is awareness among farmers about the benefits of desi cow and they are  buying desi cows on their own.

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

Why is it that a government that is giving thousands of crores in subsidy for chemicals and fertilizers, not providing assistance to buy desi cow? Farmers seems to have this question. What answer would you like to give them?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

There will always be many such questions. There may not be direct answers for them. What we are saying is that this is good for them. We are also asking them to take care of their own future by themselves regardless of whether subsidy is given or not. Your argument is good.

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

No, this is not my argument but farmers are arguing this. Do you think government is thinking on these lines?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

Yes, farmers argument is good but you see the fertilizer subsidy is about 70 crores a year. This is provided by Central Government. If Central Government decides to stop that subsidy and asks us to provide subsidy for buying cow, then we will definitely implement it. However, it is an issue to be decided by Government of India.  But what we are saying to farmers is that regardless of subsidy, they should understand that they need to protect their own future by increasing yields and reducing costs. But what they are saying is very important point – there is no doubt that fertilizer subsidy is a wasteful subsidy. We could use the same funds for supporting farmers practicing natural farming. In summary, I agree that their argument is correct but I also say that there is no need of every farmer to buy desi cows. All they need to ensure is there must be enough cows in the entire village.  

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

In your training programmes, are you focussing on youth – particularly those who are already into farming or the freshly passed out intermediate or graduate students? What is your position on youth?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

What we have noticed is that many farmers in the village are young. As you said some have studied upto intermediate. Some have gone upto graduation. They are not getting employed outside. So, if we make farming as a profitable business, they themselves can give employment to 2-3 people. We have seen lot of interest among the youth. Even in our training programmes we could see lot of young people. I have no doubt that natural farming will give a decent employment pathway and well-paid income to these youth right within the village.   

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

You said you are selecting some specific mandals within the districts to impart training. So is there a possibility of announcing chemical-free zones in the coming days?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

Absolutely. The vision of our Hon’ble Chief Minister is to transform all villages in Andhra Pradesh to Natural Farming. This will happen in several phases. In next one year, at least one Gram Panchayat in each of the Mandals will be transform into a ZBNF gram panchayat. This is by 2018-19. By 2021-22, programme will begin in every Panchayat. There are 12,924 Panchayats in Andhra Pradesh. By 2024, we have plans to transform all farmers in Andhra Pradesh. There is a plan in place for this. To this effect, resource mobilization work is in progress. The idea is not to stop with just the existing 2000 villages.

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

Finally, what is your message to farmers? Be it related to the Palekar ji’s training programme or about Government of AP’s plans for the farmers? What do you want to tell farmers?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

Natural Farming is a blessing for farmers. Farmers can reduce the costs of cultivation, reducing the risks, increase the yields and incomes, improving the quality of produce with Natural Farming. Our strong recommendation to farmers is that every farmer must adopt this. The purpose of Subhash Palekar ji’s training programme is to make every farmer who attends the programme as a trainers. Each of them must be able to train at least 100 more farmers.

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

You are taking assistance from few institutions such as Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and Azim Premji Philanthropic Initiatives. What kind of support are you taking from these institutions? What is your experience working with them?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

Azim Premji Philanthropic Initiatives (APPO) is a philanthropic organization of Mr Azim Premji. They are providing Rs. 100 Crores to assist this programme by Government of AP. This assistance is towards Technical Support that helps us engage good professionals at State and District level and also get scientific institutions from international-level to establish the science behind ZBNF. Also, this entire programme is about farmers. In this regard, APPI support is also used to develop Master Farmers who will train the farmers. In the next 5 years, we aim to develop 30,000 Master Farmers. We are identifying the organizations which can develop such a large number of Master Farmers. These organizations will now work on various aspects of training including curriculum development. APPI is supporting in these areas. In addition, APPI is also supporting in impact evaluation. Their support is also towards developing farmers institutions like farmer producer organizations. So their support is very very valuable support. Mr Azim Premji himself visited our work in Anantapur district. There is a good backing from Azim Premji family for this programme and we are getting very good support from them.

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) is supporting our digital extension system by way of video production and dissemination through Digital Green Foundation. BMGF, Government of AP and Digital Green Foundation have entered into a tripartite MoU recently. Through this,  we are producing video films on various aspects of ZBNF for training farmers. This support is coming from BMGF.  

As I have told you earlier, United Nations Environment Programme and Government of Andhra Pradesh are arriving at a partnership shortly.

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

Be it chemical farming, organic farming or natural farming – Government or scientists or department officials are supporting only on the production side of farming. But no support is being provided on marketing the produce of the farmers. Middlemen are benefiting more and seems to be riding on the hard work of the farmers. What farmers spend for two days, middlemen are exploiting their work and earning in just two hours. This is one analysis. Regarding marketing, what is your suggestion to the farmers?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

We are moving forward in various aspects in the area of marketing because only one strategy may not work. Also marketing strategy does not work effectively with just one or two farmers. We need substantial number of farmers in a village to come forward to get better market access. Firstly, within this ZBNF programme, we are creating Farmers Self-help groups, Farmers Federations and Farmer Producers Organizations. Once farmer-owned institutions are established, training on marketing will be given to those institutions. A basic marketing infrastructure will be setup in these villages. The goal is to get fairer prices to the farmers through their own institutions. Secondly, there are few farmers who are already doing marketing. We are planning to create a database of such farmers and link them up with other neighbouring farmers. Thirdly, few large marketing institutions like ITC, 24-letter mantra and few other institutions from Delhi and Mumbai are coming forward. They are planning to adopt few clusters, monitor the farming practices and having grading and value-addition in the villages itself and then take them to forward markets. And then, World Economic Forum, FAO, United Nations Environment Programme are bringing internationally reputed institutions that can support in marketing initiatives.

Also, our Chief Minister will be visiting Davos in January 2018. There he will discuss with CEOs exclusively on ZBNF. Marketing will also be an important part of the discussion. But there are multiple strategies. One, ZBNF farmers are able to store their produce for longer duration than non-ZBNF farmers. This because the investments are low. So, they have a leverage to sell it at the right price. That is different from other farmers. Tomato prices have fallen steeply. Non-ZBNF farmers have no other choice but to plough back the land and incur losses, while ZBNF farmers are telling that they can leave the tomatoes to the plants for another 2 weeks or so as the plant is strong. In a way, Natural Farming is enabling plants as the natural storage place. This is unique. So there are such multiple strategies.

We have seen one thing from our analysis of agriculture economics of a farmer and that is – Most farmers incur losses mainly because of high investments, and interest to service the loans needed for those investments, plus yield is not predictable. If we are able to help farmers to save on these aspects, then it is much impactful than any other things.

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

Your comment on hmtv programmes for farmers?

Advisor to Govt of AP:

I am very impressed. Everyday I watch your programmes on YouTube. In your programmes you are highlighting the farmers who are doing natural farming. I am very impressed. If other TV channels also telecast similar way, we can bring about the transformation sooner. My compliments to HMTV because I see your programmes every day and you telecast about Natural Farming. I circulate your videos to our people. Recently you telecasted a 4 minute programme on Radhakrishna Murthy garu – 4 lakhs per acre. He is giving advice to many others in Guntur. You have taken a video and shown it. Recently in Tarkanpally, Kurnool district,you have showcased a cattle hostel. So it is a very good service.

hmtv AGRI (Interviewer):

Thank you sir. This was the exclusive interview with Mr Vijay Kumar garu. By 2022, Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s vision is to double the farmers income.  By 2021 itself, Mr Vijay Kumar says that Government of AP’s vision is to transform entire AP into Natural Farming. HMTV suggests to farmers to practice natural farming and reduce costs of cultivation and move towards sustainable agriculture. You were watching exclusive interview with Mr Vijay Kumar garu. Namaskaram.  

2 Replies to “HMTV Exclusive Interview with Mr Vijay Kumar, Advisor to Govt of AP”

  1. Hai sir my name is k jagannath
    konakondla (village)
    vajrakarur(mandalamu)
    anantapuramu(dist.)
    mobile : 9014428001

    i attended zbnf classes from december 31st to january 8th 2018.
    i received one bag
    but i didn’t received any certificate and books
    we are contacting our crp,but no one responding sir…

    previously i trained 4 months in zbnf with one farmer

    iam interested to work as CRP

    please give me information this

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *